Crossing the equator

Our brains have an amazing capacity for recalibration. We live with a constant directional force imposed on us. The Coriolis Effect is most pronounced closer to the poles and less pronounced at the equator. The trick it, it rotates in two different directions depending on which hemisphere you are in.

You might be really good at directional orientation. You always know which way is north. You are confident in this. Until you cross the equator. You find yourself constantly out by 180 degrees.

It’s like throwing a ball to a friend on the opposite side of the merry-go-round. When you throw, it veers left, when he throws, it veers right. (Assuming a clockwise rotation.)

The same thing happens when we expand cross-border.

Just because you are good at something in one context, does not mean you will have the answers when the context changes. Your brain will adapt, but only if you know what is going wrong.

For this, you need local expertise.

 

James Coleman

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